Complex and Brutal is Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights

Wow! I did not think when I picked up Wuthering Heights that it would be so brutal. The entire book was filled with unrelenting cruelty and violence, both physical and verbal.  Wuthering Heights would make Jane Austen fans go rushing back to Pride & Prejudice for equilibrium.  Abuse was what literally shaped and reshaped the characters… Continue reading Complex and Brutal is Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights

In An Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter Levine, Ph.D.

Peter Levine, Ph.D.,  has devoted most of his life to understanding the body and its experience of trauma. He has sought to understand how the body encounters trauma and if it is possible to live a healthy life after experiencing trauma. With his book, In An Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores… Continue reading In An Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter Levine, Ph.D.

The Integrity of the Gypsy People: Zoli by Colum McCann

I fell in love with Zoli, although, at times I thought she and the Gypsy people were too distant. I wanted to understand them better, to understand her better, but she was constantly moving: first with her grandfather as they traveled away from the site where her parents and siblings were brutally killed, and then,… Continue reading The Integrity of the Gypsy People: Zoli by Colum McCann

The Fearless Heart of Carolyn Forché, What You Have Heard Is True: A Memoir of Witness and Resistance

I just finished Carolyn Forché's memoir, What You Have Heard Is True. It was brutal. It feels almost shameful to say it was a beautiful memoir because it tells the story of Forché's time in El Salvador before and partly during the civil war there. I’m not sure why I was so surprised by the… Continue reading The Fearless Heart of Carolyn Forché, What You Have Heard Is True: A Memoir of Witness and Resistance

Racism, Disability and the Desire for Perfection: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible takes its readers to the Congo/Zaire with its main characters, Nathan and Orleanna Price and their four daughters, Rachel, Leah, Adah, and Ruth May. The Price's are Southern Baptist missionaries from Georgia, who set out in 1959 to enlighten the Congolese by bringing them Jesus. When they arrive to the little village,… Continue reading Racism, Disability and the Desire for Perfection: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver